Donald Trump on Real Estate

I love what Trump says about the business of real estate.

I am a big believer in setting up business systems for all
my clients. So it is cool to hear from a master like Trump
about the importance of systems!

Sincerely,

Tom Kish

THE REAL ESTATE BUBBLE OF 2005?

‘What Donald Trump has to say about the latest business
opportunities found in Real Estate Investing.’

By Phyllis N. Schwartz

Staff Writer

Have you ever wanted to become a millionaire?

If so – and, if you live in the United States, there is now a
very REAL chance for you to enjoy the same opportunities
as Donald Trump.

You don’t need to invest in real estate to be wealthy. But, by
and large it is the easiest, most leveraged way to build real,
sustainable wealth. With mortgage rates at an all time low and
tax laws favoring real estate holdings, now is an ideal time to
profit from the greatest real estate gold rush in history.

Marriage, job changes, divorce, new families, death — the
average American moves every five to six years. And with that
constant stream of movement across the United States, more
than 12 million homes are bought and sold every year. Many of
these will be great deals that you, yourself, could be profiting
from.

The very same principles that make Donald Trump a fortune
with New York City skyscrapers will work for the average
investor, no matter what size the property.

So precisely what can the small real estate investor learn from a billionaire wheeler- dealer like Donald Trump? According to George Ross, Executive Vice President and Senior Counsel for the Trump Organization (and, of course, Apprentice co-star), one of the cornerstones of Trump’s philosophy is “Improve any location.”

And that’s just what Trump did in his very first real estate deal on a foreclosure of a 1,200 unit apartment complex in Cincinnati, Ohio. Without a penny invested, Donald and his father, Fred, were able to turn the apartment complex around by doing some remodeling and taking a tough stance on rent collection.

In the single most valuable lesson in Donald Trump’s real estate career, he learned how the government would assist buyers in purchasing property with little or no financial backing and how to get such aid. His passion for real estate grew from there and he went on to create the strategies and systems that turned his business into an empire.

“Deals are my art form. Other people paint beautifully on canvas or write wonderful poetry. I like making deals, preferably big deals. That’s how I get my kicks.”

In New York City, the Trump signature is now synonymous with
the renowned Trump Tower, The Trump International Hotel &
Tower, The Trump Park Avenue and the Trump Building at 40 Wall Street. He also owns golf courses in 4 states, and current projects include the building of the biggest development ever approved by the NYC Planning Commission .

Ranked #228 on Fortune Magazine’s list of the world’s billionaires, Trump stated: “Real estate is at the core of almost every business, and it’s certainly at the core of most people’s wealth. In order to build your wealth and improve your business smarts, you need to know about real estate.”

The most obvious problem that confronts many would-be investors
is lack of know-how and/or financial resources. Common sense
would dictate that wanting to make money in real estate is simply not enough. Knowing how to get it is the real key to success. Like any other profitable business, it takes a proven business system.

In Trump: The Art Of The Deal, ‘The Donald’ gives his own assessment: “If you take care of the downside, the upside will
take care of itself. In other words, if you have a contingency
plan for everything that can go wrong, you can’t help but succeed.”

So how does the average Joe or Jane actually succeed in real estate?

Because you can’t know it all, no matter how smart, educated or experienced, there is no way to acquire all the wisdom you need to make your business flourish. It’s precisely why 95% of franchises succeed and only 25-35% of independent businesses fail. Wanting to make money in real estate is simply not enough.

Just as Donald Trump had starting out, you need a great mentor
with a proven track record to lead the way and support your
efforts… also a proven business system that allows you to invest in all types of real estate without ever having to tie up all your own cash. It is wise to begin your journey using the research, experience and wisdom of those who have been there before you.

The beauty of a franchise is that it provides a proven business
model with years of experience behind it. As far afield as real
estate investing may be from starting a McDonalds, the principle is the same. If you can find a real estate investment teaching program that eliminates much of the trial and error and allows you to get a quick start with a proven system, you’ve just found your own golden arches.

True success is bigger than any one person, no matter how well educated or experienced that person may be. There is no reason
to settle for anything less. Once again, to quote the king of real estate: “If you’re going to be thinking anything, you might as well think big.” Sound advice to anyone who wants to become a millionaire.

p.s. Don’t forget to check out my one of a kind business system for real estate investing.

I am the only expert teaching you how to use business lines of
credit to invest in real estate instead of cash!

Boston Real Estate – Choosing the Right Boston Real Estate Agent

As a successful Boston real estate agent, it always puzzled me how and why some people choose particular Boston real estate agents to sell their homes. For most of us, a real estate purchase is the single largest investment we will ever make in our lives. Still, when it comes time to capitalize on this investment many home sellers are much too casual and have very low standards for the person they choose to handle the sale of their property.

I can cite many examples of poor decision making when it comes to home-sellers choosing a real estate agent, but there is one example from my experience that really boggled my mind.

I received a call from a woman about six months ago who asked me to do a Comparable Market Analysis (CMA) of her Boston Condo. (I gladly obliged and confirmed a time to meet with her and to tour her property.) The CMA process typically entails an initial tour of the subject property, comprehensive market research to produce a report, and an in-depth, in-person listing presentation. After meeting the client, viewing the property, doing the necessary research and presenting my report, I was certain that this woman would list her property with me. She disclosed to me that she had interviewed five other Boston realtors and that she was “by far” most impressed with my presentation and me. She cited my track record selling Boston real estate and Boston condos, my knowledge of the Boston real estate market, and my professionalism as the reasons she viewed me as the most qualified real estate agent to sell her home. She also disclosed to me that my service charge was identical to the five other agents she interviewed so “price” wasn’t an objection I would have to overcome.

After giving her forty-eight hours to review her options (I of course sent her a thank you card for considering my services), I followed up with a phone call to see if she had any outstanding questions. To my surprise she told me that she had decided to list her property with a friend, who is also her hairdresser, and sells real estate part-time in a suburb of Boston. My initial shock came from the fact that she decided to list her property with an out-of-town broker, someone who had very little knowledge of the Boston real estate market. But what really blew me away was her decision to list her property with a friend, who not only had very little total real estate experience, but who works part-time in real estate and had never sold a property before! Her exact words were: “She is a very nice person and I would like to help her jumpstart her real estate career.”

At this point she had already made her decision and the last thing I was going to do was to disqualify her friend as a competent real estate agent, so I wished her the best of luck and told her that I would try my best to cooperate with her friend to sell the unit. She thanked me and recognized my professionalism. What I really wanted to ask her was this: If I told you that you had $150,000 to invest, (which is approximately what she stood to profit from the sale of her home), and your friend, who is also your hairdresser, called you and told you that she just started selling stocks part-time and she wanted you to invest your money with her, would you do it?

Fortunately, most of the people I have actually posed this question to have thought about it and answered no. Unfortunately, there are too many people who do not think about their real estate investment in these terms and are essentially answering yes! For some unknown reason many people are much too casual when it comes time to sell their real estate investment, when if fact, most people look to the equity they have in their homes to pay for important things like major home improvements and educational expenses while they own their home.

It turns out, the woman I used in the example above ended up calling me in a panic after her property sat on the market for six months, overpriced by almost 10%. She had to sell the property within 60 days of calling me as she had been carrying two mortgages for four months and was running out of money. I ended up selling the property three weeks later for a reduced price because the property had become “stale” in the eyes of buyers in the market and she had very little bargaining power when it came to negotiating price.

You must have high expectations when choosing your Boston real estate agent and must truly think of your real estate investment as the largest single investment you will ever make in your life. The following is a list of 25 questions that you must ask all of the realtors you interview before choosing one to sell your Boston home:

1. Are you a licensed sales person/broker in the state of Massachusetts?

2. Do you have a licensed broker in your office?

3. How long have you been selling real estate?

4. Do you strictly work as a seller’s agent?

5. Do you have buyer’s agents working in your office?

6. Will you offer compensation to sub-agents, buyer agents, or facilitators, or all?

7. What is my liability if you offer compensation to and welcome sub-agents and he or she misrepresents my property?

8. Will you ever allow a buyer or another agent to enter my home without you being present?

9. Is selling real estate your full-time job?

10. How much real estate have you sold in my neighborhood in the past year?

11. Can you provide 5 references of people you have sold for in the last year?

12. How many listings do you currently have under contract?

13. What is the “average days on market” for all of your listings over the past year?

14. What is the average ratio of asking price to sales price for the last 10 properties you have listed?

15. What differentiates you and your company from your competition?

16. How will you arrive at an appropriate suggested asking price for my home?

17. How and where will you market my property?

18. What is your service fee?

19. What services are included in your fee?

20. What is the length of your listing contract?

21. Is your contract an exclusive listing contract?

22. Are your real estate forms in compliance with the laws in Massachusetts?

23. What professional real estate organizations do you and your company belong to?

24. What is the state of the Boston real estate market? Is this a good time to sell?

25. What properties would I be directly competing with if I put my property on the market today?

Boston Real Estate – You Still Have Considerable Control Over the Sale of Your Boston Home

Boston real estate is a hot topic. Daily newspaper articles comment on whether or not a bubble exists in the Boston real estate market, when and if it will pop, how interest rates affect the market, why Boston residents are snapping up interest-only loans, and how foreign investors in our treasuries keep interest rates low. There are articles about the location and amenities of Boston homes, why those factors make our region so desirable, and why the completion of the big dig is going to make Boston real estate even more desirable.

Journalists remark on the gentrification of our neighborhoods and the development of the Boston Seaport. Reporters poll Boston real estate agents for comments on the empty nesters moving out of suburban neighborhoods to buy luxury Boston condos, the rapid pace in which Dorchester homes are being converted into condos, whether large firms leaving the city might impact Boston real estate, or if bio-technology firms will continue to drive up home prices. We are flooded with theories and statistics of how the weather affects Boston real estate, or how the parking affects South Boston real estate. We hear about the growth of mortgage companies and the increase in mortgage products available to today’s real estate consumer. It isn’t unusual to hear dinner conversation revolving around the next investor hot spot, if having a buyer agent is a necessity, if a 5 year-arm is a good product for a Boston condo purchase, or if the success of the Patriots and Red Sox has any influence on the Boston real estate market.

However, as a Boston real estate agent, I do know that despite all of the external influence driving our market: foreign investors, fed hikes, an influx of jobs, and the relocation of Boston companies; the Boston homeowner still has a great amount of power and influence over the sale of their Boston home.

How?

Despite what the Globe, the Herald, the Times or the WSJ reports about what drives the real estate market, people buy and sell homes. There are numerous factors that go into each home buying decision, and although everyone is different, there is some level of emotion that plays into the majority of home purchases. It could be that the buyer likes the cast iron lights that line the streets, the willow tree that shades the backyard, or the coffee-house at the end of the street. The prospective buyer might like the color of the living room or the view of the water from the second floor. It won’t be the only reason to purchase your home, but for every purchase, there will be at least one defining influence that is based on emotion instead of reason.

And what that means for each seller is that when a prospective buyer walks into your Boston home, they are influenced by the color of your walls, the clutter on your shelves, the cleanliness of your windows. If your home looks like a page out of Home and Garden, then no matter how old, worn or non-existent their own furniture is, on some conscious or subconscious level, they will leave with the impression that their stuff would look this good if they moved into your home. Conversely, if your home looks like the before photo of Extreme Makeover, they might not be able to get past the wet dog smell or the fluorescent turquoise molding to see the beauty of your property. Here are a few guidelines that might be helpful when getting your Boston home ready for sale.

1) Don’t give them reason to cross you off the list. While it would be ideal to put out flowers, light candles or bake a batch of cookies prior to open houses or showing appointments, the most important thing you can do is make sure there are no easy reasons to eliminate your house from the prospective pool of Boston housing stock. This means there should be no odors emanating from your home, pathways should be cleared for walking, and that nothing should be broken or falling down.

2) Paint walls neutral colors. In recent years there has been an explosion in the number of trendy paint colors, you might just love Tangerine Zing in the bathroom or Purple Rain in your kitchen. Consider repainting. It’s much more difficult to have a hate relationship with Antique White or Ecru.

3) Eradicate clutter. Invest in some organizational storage equipment. You might ask yourself why you would make your home look perfect just as you are about to move out of it? It will be worth every penny and minute spent de-cluttering. You can take the letter sorter/shoe organizer/magazine holder with you. In the meantime, you want your countertops as clean and your closets as organized as possible.

4) Remove excessive furniture. Make rooms feel more spacious. If carpets are hiding nice hardwood floors, remove those too.

5) Let the sun shine in! Open blinds, pull back heavy curtains, but make sure the view is something that won’t scare off a future buyer. Clean the windows so that they sparkle. Turn on all lights even during daytime showings. If you have views of the Boston skyline or shoreline, make them the focal point of the room!

6) Get curb appeal! Clean your gutters, get a new doormat, put a potted plant outside your door, and make sure your house number is visible.

The Boston real estate market is a complex and ever evolving marketplace. If you are looking to put your Boston home up for sale, being prepared and following our helpful tips on staging your home is the first step towards your success. Make sure you ask your listing agent how to enhance your Boston condo, single or multi-family home. Prospective buyers and Boston real estate agents will be scouring the MLS listings, websites and newspaper ads to find homes that are well kept and look appealing. As a seller in the Boston real estate market, you want your home to shine through in website photos, real estate ads and marketing materials.

Rooney Real Estate is a full service residential real estate company servicing South Boston, the South Boston Seaport, and Dorchester for more than twenty years. In 2003 Rooney Real Estate was recognized by LINK, the Listings Information Network, as the top real estate firm in South Boston, MA, in total sales revenue. On May 10, 2005, MLS (Multiple Listing Service) listed Rooney Real Estate as the top firm in South Boston, MA, in total sales and total dollar volume thus far in 2005. Rooney Real Estate also has an unparalleled record of giving back to the youth sports leagues and non-profit organizations in the communities they service.

Call 1-866 ROON DOG, or visit www.rooney-re.com for more information.